Welcome 2 November 2009!

Monday, 2 November 2009

Here’s a Gizmodo that will rock you. Until now we’ve danced around it; haven’t really seen it at work in our lives; but now it’s out there: The Droid.

Go back one step. You’ve heard about computer  operating systems (OS)? Big whup. An OS is the internal software the makes a computer work: On PCs it’s called Vista or Windows 7. On Macs it’s called Tiger or Snow Leopard. And for years, there’s been a hidden dragon out there used mostly by Geeks called Linux (pronounced lin-ucks).

Linux lives in the world of open source computing, and its open source OS that’s about to light up your life, on November 6.

If you’ve been watching the World Series, you’ve seen this advert for Droid:

Okay. Neato. But what is it?

Yeah, but what’s the difference, what’s the big deal about this “open source software? Is it just the magic that you see in the Droid, or does “open source” signify something more? The future. Start thinking.

Open source software (OSS) is computer software for which the source code and certain other rights normally reserved for copyright holders are provided under a software license that meets the Open Source Definition or that is in the public domain. This permits users to use, change, and improve the software, and to redistribute it in modified or unmodified forms. It is very often developed in a public, collaborative manner. Open source software is the most prominent example of open source development and often compared to user-generated content.[1] The term open source software originated as part of a marketing campaign for free software.[2] A report by Standish Group states that adoption of open source software models has resulted in savings of about $60 billion per year to consumers.[3][4 Source: http://bit.ly/19Xq7E

Have you been thinking? Work in small groups. Speak quietly, like you were executives in a board room, or diners at a fine restaurant and be prepared to present your answeres to the class:

1. How might “open source” software Droid compete with a “closed source” iPhone OS?

2. Be logical. Think about iPhone’s heard start on Droid. At the end of September there were 85,000 aps and 2 million downloads for iphone products. source: http://bit.ly/2rDmv As of March, 30 million iPhones have been sold http://bit.ly/3NxPKg and I don’t know how many iPod Touches. So how can Droid compete?

3. Another hot new smartphone came on the market a few months ago called the Palm Pre. It had about 1.5 million sales in this, its first year http://bit.ly/1wEBSS It’s a closed system, not open source.

4. If you were to chose who will live and who will die, which smartphone will we be talking about burying this time next year?

5. And why is that. Group votes will be tallies on the white board.

Let’s see what we’ve learned from watching documentaries. Let’s form groups, take 15 minutes to talk and be prepared to present:

  1. Discuss why you would make a documentary video.
  2. Consider the documentaries you’ve seen in class, and describe the techniques they use to tell their stories. (e.g., how is a biography told? how can camera angles affect a story?)
  3. Describe how you would prepare to make a documentary video — what steps would you take? (e.g., choose equipment, decide on a story; ask yourself why it is important and who might watch.) Be very specific.
  4. What role does each of the creators in a documentary play? What exactly do they do? They are: the producer, the director, the sound operator, cinematographer, writer, composer. Who could fit most easily into dual roles. For instance, a long distance truck driver could use a navigator, but if necessary he or she could play both roles. Now, apply this example to documentary film making.

Now, let’s take another 15 minutes and staying in the same groups and be prepared to present. You will decide on a documentary you would want to make if I could provide you with equipment. Tell me why you think it would be important for people/audiences to see this story. Would they be entertained or informed? Consider a realistic way you could present or distribute you documentary and how you might go about advertising it. Consider how long it might take you to make the documentary. What resources would you need? How much money would it cost you to produce? How would you rise the money? What equipment would you need? What role would you want to play in the documentary?

Wednesday, 28 October 2009

A development in the browser wars you should follow (also an idea with cool potential) “Google Social Search aims to make social networks more useful” – http://bit.ly/2aTHKs

File under: What is the World Coming To? Sane or not, you decide: “Live birth on Gannett-run social networking site” Could live coverage of executions be far behind? http://bit.ly/4lfC3P

Here’s an idea I’d be eager to try — your thoughts? Connecting students, teachers through social network” http://www.njbiz.com/article.asp?aID=79613

Another way to waste time, or Pandora and more? Check it out: GETGLUE.COM

The Hollywood giant as popular documentarian, Martin Scorsese: an introduction to the film/video documentary

We’ll compare and discuss the technique in his film, “No Direction Home” with “Shine a Light.”

As you watch, consider what is the chief difference in his subject matter

What is the chief difference in his technique

Where does the director, Scorsese position himself vis-avis his subject; what role does his play?

Tuesday, 27 October 2009

Cool Warm Up

Let’s first talk about blogs…

Now let’s go on to something mysterious —

What the in the world is open source computing?
Does this help, from Wikipedia?

“Open source is an approach to the design, development, and distribution of software, offering practical accessibility to a software’s source code. Some consider open source as one of various possible design approaches, while others consider it a critical strategic element of their operations. Before open source became widely adopted, developers and producers used a variety of phrases to describe the concept; the term open source gained popularity with the rise of the Internet, which provided access to diverse production models, communication paths, and interactive communities.”

What questions should we be asking?

  1. If not open source, what is closed source?
  2. Who’s fight is this anyway?
  3. Why does it matter to you and me? Or maybe it doesn’t?

 

And is this what we’re really talking about… what’s the difference between open source code and free software?

Wednesday, 21 October 2009

Test today for Levels 1 and 2

If we finish early —

Let’s review Monday’s work — Pair up for comment and dicussion

1. What did we discover that ABC News and the New York Times had in common?

2. What news developments has the WWW yielded?

3. How does this compare with, say, Google News?

I concluded with my sense that this evolutionary change in news media started withe the Drudge Report

http://www.cubestat.com/www.drudgereport.com

It then evolved into the Huffington Post. What is the Huffington Post?

http://www.cubestat.com/www.huffingtonpost.com

The Daily Beast by Tina Brown is its chief competition — but its failing. What problem do you see for the Beast. Why might it be failing?

http://www.cubestat.com/www.thedailybeast.com

20 September 2009

Let’s see what Clay Shirky is telling us about the WWW and the news. BTW, In The Long Tail, Chris Anderson calls Shirky “a prominent thinker on the social and economic effects of Internet technologies.”[5] source for me, Wikipedia.

http://www.ted.com/talks/clay_shirky_how_cellphones_twitter_facebook_can_make_history.html

Let’s review yesterday — Pair up for comment and dicussion

1. What did we discover that ABC News and the New York Times had in common?

2. What news developments has the WWW yielded?

3. How does this compare with say, Google News?

I concluded with my sense that this evolutionary change in news media started withe the Drudge Report

http://www.cubestat.com/www.drudgereport.com

It then evolved into the Huffington Post. What is the Huffington Post?

http://www.cubestat.com/www.huffingtonpost.com

The Daily Beast by Tina Brown is its chief competition — but its failing. What problem do you see for the Beast. Why might it be failing?

http://www.cubestat.com/www.thedailybeast.com

19 September 2009

Warm up —

If you remember Nexi —

Let’s have a look at some similar and possibly more interesting developments: David Hanson: Robots that “show emotion”

Bulldog — The First Future Newspaper

Nowhere is it easier to understand what is meant when we say we are moving from words to pixels and bytes than when we examine the fate of America’s newspapers. Newspapers are more accessible on line. But there’s something more, we begin to see the power inherent when we movable type to electronic media.

http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory?id=7093867

Newspapers are looking for a solution, a way to maintain the tradition of the printed word:

http://blog.ted.com/2009/04/the_fate_of_the.php

Why are citizens having such a great impact?

http://www.ted.com/talks/clay_shirky_how_cellphones_twitter_facebook_can_make_history.html

What does the textbook say?

Look at these two blogs. Let’s review them. First the Huffington Post (Ariana Huffington) and then the Daily Beast (Tina Brown — Vanity Fair and the New Yorker) and the guy who started it all, Matt Drudge of the Drudge Report –

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/

http://www.thedailybeast.com/

http://www.drudgereport.com/

So where does this leave us?



Are you ready for…

THE TEST?

2008-12-07 woman_screaming

Not afraid yet? Okay. Go to a computer, but resist signing-on to facebook. And definitely don’t play music or listen to your mp3, unless you’re ear-plugged into Mozart. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mozart_effect (I command you, as your teacher, to ignore the fact I’ve sent you to Wikipedia or to tell anyone that I endorse the site as an excellent starting point for your research.)

Next, while you and your computer are having an intimate moment enjoying “The Jupiter,” you will look up and then print out these names and terms; the print-out will then serve as your own hand-made study guide, your own creation. Take responsibility! These are the names I want you to look up and print out: Tim Berners Lee; Larry Page (or Sergey Brin); Mark Zuckerberg; Chad Hurley (or hint, hint — Steve Chen, Jawed Karim); Jack Dorsey; J Gutenberg.

Be Prepared!

Be Prepared!

Here are some terms to print out for your own personal handmade customized detailed study guide: Net Neutrality; be prepared to also explain what it means to you and to the future of the World Wide Web. (Hint: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jev2Um-4_TQ). Also, what do we mean when we talk about “The Long Tail.” Why might it be important? (Hint: Check Wikipedia.) Who developed the term? What is WIRED magazine, and why would it matter to Mass Comm? How does the index of our textbook reveal the velocity, the speed, at which Mass Communications is changing. Give an example or, rather, two examples. No! Cite three examples!

Old School Mass Comm

god2-sistine_chapelSome mind-altering changes took place in the 16th century. They helped to create the world we live in, the world we study in school. What were they? Well, there was the Reformation, for one. Now, you may name three other astonishingly long-lived, civilization-changing 16th century developments. What could have caused such monumental changes to occur in such a narrow frame of time, around 100 years? A UFO? Hint: It was a commonplace medium, which would eventually give rise to other media. (What is the difference between a medium and the media? Do you know? It could be in the test.) How would you compare that medium, which was invented around 1450, to the World Wide Web, which came to life around what year? (Be prepared to answer when, around what year, the World Wide Web was created.) And what do the developments of the 16th century suggest about the significance of the World Wide Web? Hmmmm. Were you listening to my three lectures + my very visible comments in a certain relevant blog???

And here’s some extra help… check Clay Shirky’s comments after the third minute through the 17th minute – http://www.ted.com/talks/clay_shirky_how_cellphones_twitter_facebook_can_make_history.html

Okay, here’s what you most feared!

The Hard Part

Watch the video below and be prepared to explain in a brief essay why it might be relevant to you, to your classroom and to your educational experience.

youtubeWhy would YouTube be banned from the computers of our school? Why is YouTube important? What can YouTube do for you? The following video represents the core of our test because it not only talks about YouTube, it tells us a great deal about Mass Communications and the state of media in general. Here is where you’ll find the video under discussion on YouTube — http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TPAO-lZ4_hU

Or, if it works, you can view the site below:

16 October 2009 — WATCH THIS SPACE

TEST INFORMATION COMING SUNDAY. TEST ON TUESDAY. CAN YOU MAKE IT? ARE YOU READY? ARE YOU?

YOU?

mcluhan

tim_berners_lee

weschweb2